An Examination of Measurement Context and Representational Effects of Consumer Expectations

  • Kay Palan
  • R Kenneth Teas

Abstract

The authors report the results of an experiment in which the discontinued expectations theory of consumer satisfaction is tested under conditions that facilitate the separation of empirical effects involving the consumer satisfaction model (i.e., theoretically meaningful effects) from empirical effects resulting from the measurement context. The experiment was designed to examine predictors and consequences of consumer satisfaction and to examine the degree to which expectations produce effects independent of measurement context effects. The findings extend previous research, providing further strong support for the strategic implications of the disconfirmed expectations theory, particularly with respect to the complex processes that link consumer expectations with product choice behavior.
Section
Journal Articles